1 Ounces Cardamom Pods

1 Ounces Cardamom Pods
1 Ounces Cardamom Pods
Item# H1CardamomPods
$5.10
Availability: Usually ships in 2-3 business days

Product Description

Cardamom Pods Folk Names: Cardamon Gender: Feminine Planet: Venus Element: Water Powers: Lust and Love Magickal Uses: The ground seeds are added to warmed wine for a quick lust potion. They are also baked into apple pies for a wonderful amatory pastry, and are added to love sachets and incenses.

Medicinal Uses: It stimulates digestion. Relieves flatulence and eases bowel spasms and symptoms of stomach disorders. Chewing the seeds sweetens the breath. Eases the cramping effects of laxatives when combined with bitter remedies. Improves the taste of bitter formulas, especially when combined with ginger and orange. Zingiberaceae Common Names : Cardamom seeds, cardamamus, cardamom, Grains of Paradise; French: cardamome;German: Kardamom; Italian: cardamomo, cardamone; Spanish: cardamomo; Thai: grawahn Parts used: seed Active Compounds: Volatile oil, fixed oil, salt of potassium, chlorophyll, starch, nitrogenous mucilage, ligneous fibre, an acrid resin, and ash. The volatile oil contains terpenes, terpineol and cineol and limonene. Applications: Cardamom is stimulant and carminative, used to treat colic and abdominal gas, yet cardamom is not used in allopathic medicine for it own properties, but is seen as a flavoring for preparations for indigestion and flatulence. Arabians attribute aphrodisiac qualities to it (see Arabian Nights.) In India it is regarded as a cure for obesity. Used as a digestive since ancient times. The pods can be used whole or split, can be bruised and fried when cooked in Indian or other recipes. Cardamom is often included in Indian sweet dishes and drinks. it is seen as a festive spice. Other uses are; in pickles, especially pickled herring; in punches and mulled wines; occasionally with poultry. It flavors Turkish coffee when served with elaborate ritual. Pungent, warm and aromatic. Warming with camphorous and lemon-like undertones. Background: Cardamom is one a very ancient spice. It is native to the East originating in the forests of the western ghats in southern India, where it grows wild. Today it also grows in Sri Lanka, Guatemala, Indo China and Tanzania. The ancient Egyptians chewed cardamom seeds as a tooth cleaner; the Greeks and Romans used it as a perfume. Vikings came upon cardamom about one thousand years ago introducing it into Scandinavia where it remains popular to this day. Cardamom is an precious spice, second only to saffron. Dosage: Infusion: 1 teaspoon of crushed seeds per cup of water; or 1:3.5 dry liquid extract: 20-30 drops 1-4 times per day in a little water Applications: Carminative, stimulant, aromatic, rarely used alone; chiefly useful as an adjuvant or corrective. The seeds are helpful in indigestion and flatulence, giving a grateful but not fiery warmth. When chewed singly in the mouth the flavour is not unpleasant, and they are said to be good for colic and disorders of the head. In flavoring they are often combined with Orange, Cinnamon, Cloves, and Caraway. Glycerine substituted honey in the 1880 United States' formula for compound tincture which increased its stability. Cardamom is in many curry powder and chai recipes, used for flavoring cakes and other treats. In Egypt they are ground and put in coffee. Traditionally the desiccated seed is chewed with betel. Their use was known to the ancients. The oil is used in perfumery. Description: This large perennial of the ginger family, called Elattari or Ilach in its native India, yields the seeds known as cardamom. The fleshy rhizome, and the alternate, lanceolate leaves are blades shape, from 1 to 2 1/2 feet long, smooth and dark green above, pale, glaucous green and finely silky beneath. ,The flowering stems spread horizontally near the ground, from a few inches to 2 feet long, bearine small, loose racemes, the small flowers being usually yellowish, with a violet lip. The fruits are from 2/5 to 4/5 of an inch long, ovoid or oblong, bluntly triangular in section, shortly beaked at the apex, pale yellowish grey in colour, plump, and nearly smooth. Cardamom grows successfully in tropical climes. The seeds are three-celled, containing in each cell two rows of dark reddish-brown seeds. Unbroken fruit is gathered before fully ripened. The seeds are powerfully aromatic. Safety: There is no known negative safety information available for this herb. For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.